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Steve Vinoski
distributed systems guy

Steve Vinoski is an architect at Basho Technologies in Cambridge, MA, USA. He’s worked on distributed systems and middleware systems for over 20 years, including distributed object systems, service-oriented systems, and RESTful web services. His interest in software quality and development speed led Steve to start exploring and using Erlang in 2006, and he’s used it as as his primary development language ever since. A magazine columnist since 1995, he currently writes “The Functional Web” column for IEEE Internet Computing where he explores the use of functional programming languages for web development.

Steve Vinoski is Giving the Following Talks
Latest Developments for the Yaws Web Server

Yaws — “Yet Another Web Server” — is an open source Erlang web server started by Claes “Klacke” Wikström in 2001. It is a full-featured scalable web server that can run standalone or be embedded into other applications. Yaws supports a very long list of features ranging from old-school CGI to modern-day WebSockets, all driven by the needs of real-world applications. Even though it’s an 11 year old project, Yaws is still under active development, continuing to gain features and enhancements as requested by its many users in the Erlang community.

In this talk, Steve, a committer on the Yaws project since 2008, will provide an overview of Yaws and its many features, and will show code examples to highlight some of its newer features. Steve will also discuss some of the internals of Yaws as well as explaining his general thoughts on the incredible power that Erlang brings to web development and distributed systems.

Talk objectives: Since Yaws is 11 years old, many people new to Erlang assume it's old and outdated and so they look elsewhere for web server support. The goal of this talk is to explore some of the latest features of Yaws and to let everyone know that it's still under active development and maintenance.

Target audience: Erlang developers interested in web development, and web developers who want to learn Erlang.