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Robert Virding
Co-Inventor of Erlang, Principal Language Expert @ Erlang Solutions
Erlang Solutions


Robert Virding is Principal Language Expert at Erlang Solutions Ltd. While at Ericsson AB, Robert was one of the original members of the Ericsson Computer Science Lab, and co-inventor of the Erlang language. He took part in the original system design and contributed much of the original libraries, as well as to the current compiler. While at the lab he also did a lot of work on the implementation of logic and functional languages and on garbage collection. He has also worked as an entrepreneur and was one of the co-founders of one of the first Erlang startups (Bluetail). Robert also worked a number of years at the Swedish Defence Materiel Administration (FMV) Modelling and Simulations Group. He co-authored the first book (Prentice-Hall) on Erlang, and is regularly invited to teach and present throughout the world.

Twitter: @rvirding

Robert Virding is Giving the Following Talks
Keynote: Over a Century of Programming

The three of us (Joe, Robert and Mike) have more than 100 years combined experience of programming. We have noticed the vast majority of software development projects use programming languages based on concepts which were developed close on a half a century ago. Tools and development environments have changed, but with few exceptions the basic paradigms remain the same.

We will reflect on our experience, what is good, what is bad and what is ugly. How did the past and our experience influence us when we developed Erlang. 

Robert Virding is Teaching the Following Courses

Target Audience: This course is aimed at experienced Erlang Software Developers and Designers who need to understand Behaviours.
Prerequisites: Existing experience using Sequential and Concurrent Programming with Erlang on projects.
• Use existing Design Patterns supported by Erlang and OTP.
• Apply Generic Behaviours, Finite State Machines and Event handler Patterns.
• Use the Supervisor and Application Behaviours Patterns.
• Write your own Design Patterns.
• Structure large Erlang based systems.
Goal: Design fault-tolerant systems.
Duration: Three days
Registration: 08:30 on 10 June 2013.
Description: You will learn the prevailing Erlang Design Patterns called OTP Behaviours. We will cover Erlang Design Patterns such as Generic Behaviours, Finite State Machines and Event Handlers. You will also learn how to develop systems using the Supervisor and Application Behaviours Patterns, so you can construct maintainable and fault tolerant software. Upon completion of this course, you will be able to extend it all, by devising your very own Behaviours.